My hinged frame

Hi all,

finally got my Maslow running - super happy with the first results! :sunglasses:

I used pretty much all of the wall height my small shop offers (~2.4m) so I ended up with a 2x1.25m workspace and the motors nearly .8m above that - should help with accuracy.
The frame is hinged so I can put it flat against the wall in the (rare) case that I don’t need it:

8 Likes

Did you add more chain? Your height above the work piece to your motors seems extra large. Looks great. I hinged mine too and love how flat it folds.

2 Likes

Thanks a lot! :slight_smile:
I went with the stock chain, based on the assumption that my narrower width would compensate the increase in height - and it did. I was able to do the calibration cuts in the corners with chain to spare.

4 Likes

@simon_makes I am so glad you posted this. I have very limited space as well (we need to get the cars in the garage when I’m not working out there) and I wanted to know if it was possible to do a hinged wall frame.

I was concerned that moving the frame between storage and “in use” positions would cause a need to re-calibrate or otherwise make it time consuming. Is it viable to store it away and then have it up and running again within minutes of starting or is it more involved?

Can you share what you learned about building it and any suggestions for someone following in your foot steps?

-Jeff

@bar and the frame design contributors: I think this is a very attractive option to consider for the “official” frame options. Given the goal of a small and easy to store system, especially on that can operate in a one car garage, having a “fold to the wall” frame is perfect for that, but the engineering of the frame is definitely more complex.

3 Likes

@simon_makes Any chance you could show us some closeups of your mounting hardware to the wall and how you handled your joints between the top of the frame and the uprights?

It occurs to me that by using an existing wall was the rear section of the frame, this also massively simplifies the construction as it is only on one plane. Is that correct?

What did you do to control the angle of the working surface once you bring it out from the wall? How do you enforce the positive stop? (edit) Ah I see, there are wooden arms hiding in the shadows of the photo. Are those hinged on the wall side and just moving in a slot on the upright or did you use something else to allow them to pivot?

-Jeff

@JWoody18 Sure, I’ll be glad to!

Let’s start with re-calibration:
I’m not too worried about it, really. The whole assembly pivots between the ‘flat’ and the ‘working’ position - motors, chains, sled, everything. As there is no alteration in chain length or any other part of the geometry, I don’t think we are running a big risk here.

Changing between positions is really simple: In order to get it running, I simply pull the frame out at bottom center with one hand and put in a center piece of wood with the other hand. The weight of the frame will push it against the wall and I can move to either side while the machine is already at the correct angle.
I kept the side legs super simple by securing them to the frame upright with a single screw and also use it as its pivot point:

The legs are cut at an angle so they are flush against the wall. In the ‘flat’ position, I simply point them upwards:

Hardware-wise, I went with four medium-sized hinges I spaced evenly on the top beam, nothing fancy here:

The motor mounts are the biggest difference to the standard Maslow frame. You cannot attach the motors directly to the top beam because they’d be on the same plane as your spoilboard. (behind it, actually) This would mean a lot of chain deflection between motors and sled, which is why you need to move the motors forward:

Same goes for the bungee cord bearings, ideally the chain should stay in the same plane, otherwise it’ll jump on the sprockets and wear them out:

I used sturdy 21mm marine grade ply for the motor mounting plates but my spacing still isn’t ideal. At the moment it’s working OK for me but if I had to space them out any further, I’d need to reinforce the whole thing (or sandwich another top beam in front of the hinged one…)

So that’s where I could see room for improvement. Like you said, it simplifies the construction because you ony have to build one plane of the frame. If I had mounted it a bit lower, I could have folded it all the way up to the ceiling and not block my window, but then again I’d be forced to remove the sled every time. Doing it like this seemed to be the smaller trade-off :slight_smile:

3 Likes

Wow, Markus (@simon_makes) this is very impressive. I definitely think this is an ideal setup for home users or those with small shops. Thanks for the detailed photos. I have a few other small work bench projects to get done and make space before I build mine but I may try and draw this up very roughly and post it for your feedback and confirmation.

@dlang I would be really interested to hear what the frame working group thinks about having a formal version of this fold-away design as part of the options. It makes a lot of sense and should be easier to build, but would need to be detailed more for beginners (like myself). And I suspect with some peer review some great ideas for improving on it could emerge. @simon_makes Have you used it much so far?

@bar Pardon my lack of experience in case this is allowed for, but I most often see idle Maslow machines with the router sitting in the center of the plywood. Is this considered the “Home” position as it is the most neutral or is there another reason? The reason I am asking is that I am hoping to build a frame like this on the right wall (standing at the garage door end, looking inwards) of my garage and I want to be able to walk along the side of my car. My garage is quite narrow and the router will protrude substantially out over (hopefully) the hood of the car or the roof. However, if I could send the sled/router combo to say the upper corner when it is “parked” and folded up, then with careful planning I could maybe have enough head room to walk under it without having to duck down. So where is home/park position for Maslow and is user definable?

-Jeff

The center is a nice spot to leave the sled because it’s easy to remove and attach the sled there because the chains have enough slack and you don’t have to lift it too high, but you should be totally fine to leave it off to one side up in the corner. You just have to remember to click in that corner and send it there when you are done for the day :wink:

Wow, Markus (@simon_makes) this is very impressive. I definitely think this is an
ideal setup for home users or those with small shops. Thanks for the detailed
photos. I have a few other small work bench projects to get done and make
space before I build mine but I may try and draw this up very roughly and post
it for your feedback and confirmation.

you need to mark ‘known’ links on your chain so that you can reset the chain
lengths anyway, once you do that it doesn’t matter what you do when you
disconnect things (going against a wall isn’t likely to give you any grief,
going to the cealing is likely to have the chains fall of the sprockets)

@dlang I would be really interested to hear what the frame working group has
to saw about having a formal version of your design as part of the options.
It makes a lot of sense and should be easier to build, but would need to be
detailed more for beginners (like myself). And I suspect with some peer
review some great ideas for improving on it could emerge. Have you used it
much so far?

part of the problem with standardizing ones that hinge to the wall is that there
are so many different walls to hinge to :slight_smile:

The basic ‘solid top beam offset from the front legs’ approach is exactly the
same if you do the ‘stock’ A-frame, build it onto a cart, the wall, or the side
of a bus

@bar Pardon my lack of experience in case this is allowed for, but I most
often see idle Maslow machines with the router sitting in the center of the
plywood. Is this considered the “Home” position as it is the most neutral or
is there another reason? The reason I am asking is that I am hoping to build
a frame like this on the right wall (standing at the garage door end, looking
inwards) of my garage and I want to be able to walk along the side of my car.
My garage is quite narrow and the router will protrude substantially out over
(hopefully) the hood of the car or the roof. However, if I could send the
sled/router combo to say the upper corner when it is “parked” and folded up,
then with careful planning I could maybe have enough head room to walk under
it without having to duck down. So where is home/park position for Maslow and
is user definable?

you want to get it out of your way, you can make a hook at the center of the top
beam and hang it from that, or just get it up out of your way to make it easier
to get material on and off the machine.

David Lang

what is your motor spacing?

I tried to get a 10’ top beam but the continental equivalent is a little bit shorter. So the motors are closer together.

While I am still waiting for the Italian custom to awake … just wanted to share my 1st thinking for my frame.

the workshop is 4.80 x 2 m (15"3/4 x 6.5"), has a window and a door opposite side. so my main goals are:

  • fit a Maslow
  • be able to open the window
  • have some storage for all accessories and more (Shop vac, other power tools)
  • also need a workshop table.

also to make something sturdy and foldable (to pass the door), windows is higher than normal, but ceiling is 2.45 m.

So I came with this first idea :

1

it’s a multifunctions foldable waste board. the backside become the top of the table.
the material “frame” corners show the working area. the bottom horizontal bar would be able to raise for smaller material to be near the center. just few holes in line and pegs. (not in the draw).

one of the 2 cabinet would host the shop vac, and maybe the cabinet door would host a gliding circular saw. the vac pipe alternatively plug into router or saw.

Simon, thank you for sharing, and maybe you can tell us more about your frame with more usage experience.
(warping ? depth reliability ?) Sled position when not in use (window opening)?

4 Likes

Hey @Stephane_Buisson, love the idea! Way more involved than mine! :+1:
I need to admit that I did not really bother to integrate my window into the Maslow frame construction. I never opened it before and it was too small to have enough light in the shop anyway… so that’s my excuse. :wink:

Having used my frame over an extended period of time now, I cannot find any warping whatsoever - looks fine.
I mainly keep it in the angled position anyway, ready for use. I placed a screw into the top center section of the spoilboard recently because having a place to hang the sled really simplifies loading new plywood. Many others have done this already.

2 Likes