Metal Top Pantograph kit available

Kirk, your kit is on the way

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Well you weren’t kidding about the shipping time. My kit showed up today here in Boston, MA. I guess we both live close to USPS distribution centers or something.

I’ve been spending tonight trying to figure out how I want my sled to look with this new improvement. I’m aiming to cut an entirely new sled for this version, since I’ve been using the first sled I cut with the temporary version. Looking forward to a more final design. I’m also very curious to see the improvement in accuracy. Even in limited amount of time cutting I can see how this will help.

Question, if I wanted to replace the center washers with bronze ones to act as some sort of bushing, do Oilite bushing make any sense or are they simply overkill for this application?

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Well you weren’t kidding about the shipping time. My kit showed up today here
in Boston, MA. I guess we both live close to USPS distribution centers or
something.

I’ve been spending tonight trying to figure out how I want my sled to look
with this new improvement. I’m aiming to cut an entirely new sled for this
version, since I’ve been using the first sled I cut with the temporary
version. Looking forward to a more final design. I’m also very curious to see
the improvement in accuracy. Even in limited amount of time cutting I can see
how this will help.

if you are cutting a new sled, don’t cut the center hole out until after you
have everything else measured. you can put a nail through the small hole of the
arm to position things instead of the trick I described with a v-grouve bit.

Question, if I wanted to replace the center washers with bronze ones to act as
some sort of bushing, do Oilite bushing make any sense or are they simply
overkill for this application?

if it’s worth doing, it’s worth overdoing :slight_smile:

it won’t hurt.

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this morning I shipped out kits to Kirk and Justin Herman.

I have payments from
Matt Remine aka @Rancher (but no address that can find)
Michael Piechowski
Clint Loggins
I’ll try to get these out in the morning on my way to the train.

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@dlang, have you determined the calibration number for these linkages?

it should be either 5.25" or 5.375" (133.35mm or 136.525mm)

David Lang

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Great, thanks :slightly_smiling_face:. The kit just arrived this afternoon, I’m cutting a sled for it now.

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pictures please (since I haven’t had a chance to do so. I’m in a meeting from 9am to 8pm tomorrow after 10-6 meetings today…

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I’m very interested in finding what the new calibration routine decides the
distance is :slight_smile:

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@dlang The kits in this batch are not per the modified design, correct? (i.e. hole is 0.26" not 0.25", etc…)?

That is correct. I am running a drill through the small hole, so things fit
there (that may be a matter of the bur causing it to seem too small), but the
holes have a smidge of slop to them.

I think they are still far more accurate than stock, and I think it would be a
hard thing to determine the difference in accuracy between these and the wood
ones (especially after some time and wear), but the next batch (after I sell the
last half dozen) will be marginally better.

I would describe the hole clearance as “Close”. There isn’t a lot of room for things to shift, which I honestly think is a good thing in this case.

Got mine installed last night on the machine. I haven’t cut anything yet, but just in moving the sled around I can see how this is going to improve my setup :smiley:

I’ll post a build log in the near future. @dlang Mayhaps I could supply some pictures for your build guide?

Short video showing my movement tests:

Yes, I did notice in reviewing the video that the left chain is twisted. I will be fixing that tonight.

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I welcome any pictures of the build process.

you used layers of plywood for the support instead of the edge of a 2x material, how high did you make your mount?

it looks like the master link is not pivoting cleanly on the left side, you may need to enlarge the hole slightly, or hit it with a file/sandpaper to make it just a smidge thiner. (or it could be the results of the chain twist)

is the right side doing the same thing?

while pivoting doesn’t matter most of the time, when you get into the bottom corners, there isn’t a lot of clearance between the chain and the metal, if they hit you will get a slight distortion, so it would probably be good to move the weights lower on the sled (just leave room for the dust hose)

what did you use for your bolts? (since you didn’t use what was in the kit)

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Mine came in the mail yesterday while I was at work (left at 5a, got home at 9p), haven’t yet had time to open and inventory it.

Ominously there’s a resealed by post office stamp on the box. Is the box supposed to rattle?

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yes,the box will rattle, but resealing it may indicate it lost some parts. That happened with one other person, so check what’s in the box.

From the top of the sled to the bottom of the stainless arm, its 3 3/16". I tried to match the height I found worked well with my original sled. I used 4 layers of 3/4" plywood that I cut at the same time as the new sled. I had figured out the location of the pantograph arms in Fusion and wanted to just through-bolt the pantograph in place.

I didn’t even notice that. It was pretty late last night when I got this all assembled. I’ll have to check if that’s because of the twist. The right master link I used came from the Maslow kit, the left came from your hardware kit. I think they are slightly different, and that could be part of the problem. There may be a second master link that came with the original kit, I’ll have to do some digging in the mess that is my shop. Worst case, I can either sand down the face or widen the hole a little to get the clearances closer to what I need.

I had positioned my weights to get the center of gravity as close to the bit as possible. Is this necessary? I can shift them back down to where I had them on the original sled.

On my machine, this will probably be exaggerated a bit. The only space I have for the machine presently is in my shop trailer, and there’s only about 112" where it will fit. I had to make a smaller frame as a consequence, and I figure I probably lost about a foot or two of usable machining area.

I used the 1/4"-20 bolts and nylocks that came with the kit for connecting all the linkages. I did add 2 Oilite thrust bearings between the linkages to reduce friction between the joints. Not sure how necessary it is, but I figured it couldn’t hurt. I also cut down the bolts to reduce the amount of thread that was sticking out.

To connect the pantograph to the sled, I used 1/4"-20 x 5" carriage bolts, which I will admit was a HUGE mistake. I will be switching them out for regular hex cap bolts when I get the chance. The carriage bolt did not hold as well as I was hoping in the plywood while I was tightening the nylock, and it just spun. I ended up grinding a slot in the bolt head with a cut-off wheel, which allowed me to use a flat head screw driver to tighten down the nuts. I again used Oilite bearings between the plywood and the linkages, as well as between the linkages (I’ll post more pictures tonight when I get home). I used quite a few of them to get the height of the arms the same. Probably not entirely necessary, but I am a perfectionist, hence the username :stuck_out_tongue:

Yes, mine rattled quite a bit. I tried my best not to shake it like a 12 year old checking to see if his birthday gift is a new LEGO kit, but I only have so much self control. The box was packed inside a plastic bag, and as soon as I took it out some washers fell out. I’d imagine if you’re missing anything, it’s probably a couple of washers. Based on your other posts, I’d imagine you have some 1/4" washers floating around the Empire of Dirt. :wink:

#4 to 3/4 iirc. Probably have 1/4 in steel, galvanized stainless, and brass. The trick will be to find any of them except the stock zinc flashed.

These days it’s the empire of cut concrete dust, those diamond saws sure make a big mess. We all wore HEPA dust masks

the bolts/washers I shipped are just the generic zinc coated ones. I thought about ordering stainless steel ones, but I wasn’t able to get good measurements of what the shoulders of the bolts would be, and I tried to size the shoulders so that none of the pivoting parts rub against thread (not that the thread will hurt the stainless steel as much as the thread will wear away faster and therefor have more slop.

All the parts except for 12 of the 25 washers were there. I might use it as an excuse to visit Fastenal to make sure that I have all washers the same thickness. I’ll check the bin in the cement dusty shop first, and see if I can dig out the box of 1/4 stainless washers - I think they were thinner than the bought by the pound zinc ones in the shop bin, although it’s a collection of multiple washers from multiple places. Wonder if nylon washers would work, think I have some of them too, from one of Grainger’s closeout sales (anybody need any 1/2x1" nylon SHCS, those might have been a little impulsive).

If I ever retire the Maslow those arms will make really good small prybars.

Winter showed up today, left a white dusting of the 4 letter word stuff on the ground. Too early for it to stick. Today’s rain and snow weren’t the best day off weather.

I envy your hardware collection. Anytime I need anything more than a 1/4"-20 or a 3/8"-16 in common sizes I need to run to the nearest hardware store to add to my collection.

Mmmm, Silicosis…