Maslow Home Maslow Community Garden

7th grade project


#21

i can’t access the onshape file. i’ve registered and am waiting for them to approve me.
thanks!


#22

it should be simple e-mail to you for access approval.


#23

I suggest you start you son with this -

Thank you


#24

Would adding a 10 foot 2x4 across the top to tie together the two arms of the stock frame be equivalent in stiffness to your alternate frame? That’s what I’ve done.


#25

that’s basically what the alternate frame it. It elimiates the angled arms entirely and just mounts the motors to a 2x4

since I posted that basic design, we’ve had the discussion come up on how to deal with very wide ranges of material thicknesses (up to 1" of variation doesn’t need anything, but if you wanted to both cut 1/4" plywood and the edge of a 2x4, it matters), and so the latest version puts the long beam (2x4 or unistrut) out on brackets in front of the frame


#26

For those who don’t want to sign up, a screenshot:


#27

The top beam is unistrut… rest is wood (for those curious about the “smaller” dimensioned top beam as I was)


#28

after a couple of hours yesterday morning my son has most of the unistrut frame built.
maslow should be shipping to us this week so we’ll see about the rest.

thanks everyone for the help so far.

i’m sure there will be more questions coming!


#29

@lilimade

Bring it. :wink:

Thank you


#30

we are considering cutting plywood into 4x4 sheets to make it easy to break
down the maslow and transport.

thoughts?


#31

also are bricks still the way to go? i see that some people have made metal sleds…
or does the ring kit not need weights.

ring kit is on order but need something temporary.


#32

Bricks are inexpensive and widely available weights. Two bricks seems to be a good amount of weight. Having the weight toward the bottom of the sled is important, I’ve built a sled that had the weight uniformly distributed, and it’s accuracy was disappointing.


#33

I believe @dlang has a folding design some where. It is totally doable. Now that you bring it up, it makes me think of how tables extend. it could use a simple ket fro lining up when put back together.

Thank you

re: bricks - http://www.maslowcnc.com/

@bar has bricks on his on the opening page of the site.


#34

depending on the frame design, it’s either no big deal, or a major problem :slight_smile:

you are using unistrut, can you give us a picture of what you are doing?


#35

my son is building it.
i’ll take a picture of what he’s done so far.
he modified the frame a bit to try to reduce
plywood sag.


#36

photos of what he’s done so far. i haven’t checked what he’s doing it. letting him figure things out for now.


#37

Looking good! Awesome that he is doing it himself.


#38

it seems like @bar is using round weights with the ring kit which is what he is eventually going to use. how many pounds? can he use this with the temporary sled?


#39

The bricks are about 5 pounds each, so go with any 5 pound weights :slight_smile:

the main use of the temporary sled is to build the fancy plywood parts that you
don’t need with the unistrut frame :slight_smile:

look up how a router circle cutter jig works and build your sled with that.

what are you using as a linkage kit (or are you waiting for a ring)? depending
on which kit you are using, you have a different process to line things up, but
in either case, it’s pretty easy so you don’t really need to make the temporary
sled, just make your permanent one.


#40

Home depot has 18-inch round table tops (1-inch thick) for less than $7. Would that work as a sled?

Edge-Glued Round (Common: 1 in. x 17-3/4 in.; Actual: 1.0 in. x 17.75 in.)

And how do you guys do those fancy links with pictures etc.