Inkscape templates

I’m sure you are aware of it, but I wanted to add to the discussion this little drop down

image

which let’s you switch the units from px to mm or inches seems relivant.

It doesn’t solve the issue of the .dpi of the saved file being platform dependant tho

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Yes that setting can be set as default in the template.

The template Uploaded has this setting.

The dpi setting should really be in the template as this is the very thing that can break things.

In Document Propperties, firrst tab, upper right corner, there you can set this to whatever you want as default in the template.

And right now i’m again confused why i’m messing with pixels in a vector drawing tool in the first place.
Once i draw a line and I define that line is 1cm or 1inch, then THAT should determine the output. But when i change the dpi then 1cm nolonger is 1cm??? What is it that I don’t get? :slight_smile:

I’m very tired today so maybe I better leave it for now.

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The missing piece is that you’re dealing primarily with graphics software, not CAD software.

In the CAD world, resolution (something per some distance) isn’t a relevant topic. 1 is just 1. Not 1 inch, not 1mm, etc… It’s important to know what the unit is (so you don’t mix them up) and you need to know it in order to re-dimension something but for pure drawing tasks, it’s irrelevant to the software because the machine handles it for you. You really don’t want to have to deal with encoder steps per inch (you really can’t anyway) nor should your design need to change based on the intended finish; again, the machine/tool/feed/speed all determine that instead.

Graphics software, on the other hand, is intended to output something. Usually on paper or a screen so it’s necessary to know the resolution of that output device in order to correctly size something when it’s output. Yes, it’s vector art and ostensibly the resolution is determined by the output device so you don’t necessarily need to know it but Inkscape also allows raster images to be imported and some of its effects are actually output as a raster layer rather than vector. For raster images to be output with appropriate quality, it’s crucial to know the output resolution of the device and therefore the native resolution of the document is important.

You also sometimes have control over the resolution of the output device: consider the high speed inkjet equipment used for billboard printing. If you’re designing a billboard that’s going to be hung 100’ off the highway and your audience will see it for 0.5 seconds while flying by it at 70mph, a 300dpi image is overkill in a way that’s detrimental to the process. (just 1" of that 15’ strip is over 16 million pixels.) So billboards are printed at something like 50 dpi. But that same inkjet device can print point-of-purchase displays that will be viewed from just a few feet away or closer… photographic quality is desired so that might be output at 1200 dpi. It’s necessary to know this and set your document up appropriately.

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PDF is resolution independent and has no native resolution. The graphics software used to output the PDF will determine the resolution of the document.

Is that a 1-step workflow? I’d really like to be able to CAD/CAM in one step and I’m finding F360 to be cumbersome in that regard.

it’s still the same steps, first you create the model, then you create the g-code, then you run the g-code.

there’s a (long) video that shows the CAM and milling steps (on a different machine) steps in onshape that I mention in this topic Good video showing the CAM workflow in onshape

Sorry, I said “1-step” I meant 1-app. (Other than Ground Control, I mean).

@dlang is right that it can be a one app process using a plugin for onshape called KiriMoto. KiriMoto is really designed to do 3D contours not cut around the edges so it might take a little hacking to get it to work well. The biggest issue I could see would be that there isn’t a clear way to layout many parts on a sheet of plywood (that I saw). I haven’t played around with it too much because their website was down the day I set aside time to look at it. I’d like to give it another go.

My workflow is to export a .dxf file from OnShape, convert it to a .svg file in Inkscape, then generate gcode from MakerCAM. It’s a lot of steps, but it works reliably.

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@dlang is right that it can be a one app process using a plugin for onshape
called KiriMoto. KiriMoto is really designed to do 3D contours not cut around
the edges so it might take a little hacking to get it to work well. The
biggest issue I could see would be that there isn’t a clear way to layout many
parts on a sheet of plywood (that I saw). I haven’t played around with it too
much because their website was down the day I set aside time to look at it.
I’d like to give it another go.

you just import many parts into the kiri:moto windows and move them around.

if your parts are the same thickness as your stock, it will just cut the pockets
and around the parts. it does tabs, etc

My workflow is to export a .dxf file from OnShape, convert it to a .svg file
in Inkscape, then generate gcode from MakerCAM. It’s a lot of steps, but it
works reliably.

watch the video and try the kiri:moto approach

David Lang

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Thanks for the tip, I will give that a go. It looked fantastic from what I remember

Thanks for that! @TheRiflesSpiral

That sounds like: This will always stay an issue. So every time Apple steps up the retina resolution then the whole issue pops up again.
Maybe someone should fork Inkscape and name it CADscape? :slight_smile:
It would be nice if Inkscape had just somekind of CAD friendly mode.

I hope I can figure out how to still make this Template as I had in mind.
But after reading your explanation it’s more clear to me now that I should shift my focus to FreeCAD.

Yes, as long as one piece of software is used to design for multiple output formats, it will always need to be dealt with. It’s just the nature of the Graphics world. Ever since we moved away from lead type we’ve had to consider resolution.

I would be thrilled with a CADScape fork! There are plenty of free CAD options, though. If you’re looking for 2D, check out Dassault’s DraftSight. For 3D on Linux, you might look into my.sketchup.com. It’s Sketchup in an HTML 5 browser.

In borwser CAD doesn’t work for me at all, i’m currently on a data capped cellphone connection, it’s already a struggle to load the Maslow forum… So that rules out browser CAD for me. Maybe when i’m at home, but most of the time when I have tome to do drawing i’m not at home. So that leaves FreeCAD as one of the few feasible options for me. And the last time I tried to use Sketchup it didn’t work at all on Linux+FireFox
But maybe that also was a connectivity issue, not sure…

I’m looking if there is a way to export the FreeCAD sketcher drawings to SVG. Until the path workbench is stable… Just need some easy way to get from FreeCAD to GroundControl. But since i have not been able to figure thatone out yet i’m still messing with inkscape since that at this point seems to be the more easy route.

I think someone did that! It’s QCAD (QCAD - QCAD: 2D CAD) I’m not sure I read that specifically but enough of the menus are the same that I think there’s some inkscape DNA in there. QCAD will generate gcode too :wink:

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The release notes say it’s a fork from CAM Expert. That has a site but it redirect errs out on my mobile

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A newer version of FireFox may help. Or Chrome. I got it to run smoothly in Safari, so I think anything is possible. :smiley:

There is, however with daily build 0.17 from Git (has bugs and crashes) that I use. But you don’t need SVG from FreeCAD as it makes the G-Code direct for the Maslow (I choose LinuxCnc as post processor, it has GBRL as well).

The SVG needs some touch-up in Inkscape and the export is manly used for Tech-Drawings. Like this:

The path workbench will do (with limits) the direct Gcode for you. This is a screenshot of the same part:

This example is not for the Maslow, but soon it can be.
I am cutting prototypes in different materials with my Chinese 6040.

Edit1:

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Thanks @Gero.

Looks like I need some patience. I’d like to stay with the more stable release (currently 0.16)
Last week i managed to create some gcode with it, But somehow I have forgotten how I did that…

O wait i did that on another machine… hmmmmm…

And:

Safari that’s Mac right?
Sketchup only has win and mac installers. I thought it was an online application.

@bar
I installed QCAD, it looks about the same as LibreCAD and to me it has the exact same non-intuitive issues, LibreCAD also has an option to export SVG specific for MakerCAM

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The Sketchup Make application only runs in Windows and OSX as far as I can tell. (I’ve never seen if there’s a Linux package but if there’s a Unix distro (OSX is Unix) then there may be one, I don’t know)

I’m speaking about my.sketchup.com which is a slightly hobbled version of Sketchup Make in an HTML 5 browser.

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LibreCAD, which I tried a few years back before becoming ensnared by 3D printers, is forked from QCAD. Forgot about it

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