Maslow 4 assembly guide feedback

The purpose of the plastic is to reduce the flex so that as the belts pull the
router around, the sled moves with it instead of tipping, the length is not
critical as long as you can anchor them in place at the top.

David Lang

Hi @bar,

Can we have the PCB holder model with all of the necessary points to mount the PCB (i.e. including all the various clearances) but minus the Dewalt specific stuff altogether, including the ‘spacer’ elements (whatever you call them). For me, this is OK as a STEP file. I can import that, I just can’t edit it easily, only add to it. I can also import SolidWorks files. But not Fusion 360 or OnShape specific formats.

So with a ‘plain’ (unbranded?) STEP file I can then come up with an alternative for the router I’m currently using, then later I’ll be able to figure out how to change everything for the spindle that I’ve already bought.

And hopefully adding that to the not shop will enable others to get started with custom router to PCB mounting.

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I have taken 1.6mm off the one side, with the bars still in place as I can’t figure out a safe way to remove them. It still seems too long. My measurements seem to indicate it was over 3mm too long, with both bars fully seated into the plastic.

I’m going to try tightening this one up now, before shortening the other one, to see what happens.

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I’ve been talking with that factory to see how we can tighten up the tolerances on those, they have been very inconsistent. You are correct that 210 is the correct length.

When everything is in spec there will still be a little bit of a gap at either side where the screws are because of the draft angle on the upright part. Basically for it to release from the mold correctly there needs to be an angle there which also leads to a little gap.

I cut 1.6mm off one side, and about 2 off the other. The shorter one tightened down really nicely, the longer one still seemed like it was putting stress on the part.

Anyway, all assembled now! I’m going to read up on the next step(s). I’ve also come up with an idea for an “estop” which is to use a radio controlled mains switch with remote control for the power feed. Any issues, I can kill the power almost instantly.

Edit: One final thing: The new pop-up enlarge on the photos is brilliant! Good job.

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So, here’s the absolute minimal PCB holder that I could come up with.

To be clear, this is just the design for a bit of plastic that can sit on the surface of the PCB, avoid all the stuff that sticks up, and then allows the mounting holes for the PCB to be accessed. The idea is that you add to it for whatever mounting you need for your router.

M4_Router_Mounting2.stl (636.4 KB)
M4_Router_Mounting2.stp (124.1 KB)

I’m happy for these to go into the Not Shop

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On the step Putting it all together where in part it says

There will be a small gap between the base of the upright and the sled initially, go around in a circle tightening each bolt gently to remove it.

There’s already been reports of the linear rods being too long (mine are, so I’m 3D printing some shims now). So that’s obviously a problem.

But related to the ‘closing the gap’ issue. I’d like to raise another concern, and that is that when you close that gap, it will warp the sled (seen this with my own eyes), which will obviously affect performance.

Any thoughts as to having slightly shorter linear rods, so that there’s no gap?

There is also a very slight gap that results from the shape of the linear rod’s feet. Which perhaps could be fixed with a very slight tweak to the mold (i.e. whole new mold) to accommodate the not completely flat feet.

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Long term, I think we need a replacement for the caps.

Instead of something that pushes down on the rods and requires an exact length,
we need something that will clamp on them and hold them steady, even if they are
a bit longer.

that’s an easy part to 3d print, but not so easy to injection mold.

David Lang

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I’m working with the factory on getting the rods lathe cut so that they can be more precise about the length and also add a beveled edge to each end of the rod which will be nice

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I have found that I have indeed installed the belt arms 180 degrees out of height/sequence order so consequently have been unable to calibrate my Maslow 4. I also somehow damaged a belt along the way and while I ordered and received replacements I find the need to disassemble basically the whole machine and its attendant requirement to unscrew untold numbers of lock-nuts then reassemble the multitude nearly overwhelming. I also feel at a loss since there are only assembly instructions, no rework/repair, pointers, or engineering drawings that might help me to find a less bad way to rework my mess (I’ve been drawing to and building from 2-D engineering drawings of mechanical assemblies for about 70 years now so I am as comfortable with them as is a fish to water).

That’s enough whining for now; I’ll go try to cheer up a bit.

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I did that too, and I still have no idea how!

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Since you’ve got the gear kicking about, what happens if the rods are “too short”? I would posit almost nothing - they still are captured tightly,and they still don’t allow any movement that isn’t in the desired direction of Z. If they were just cut too short, say 210+/-1, then at 209 they’d still be long enough to be fine, and at 211 they’d be longer but still fine. You might even be able to go even shorter.

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I think the assembly guide should show how to install the bit and what you are supposed to do with that plastic thing you 3d printed.

Seriously I just got some fresh gcode off estlcam and I have no idea how to do this.

Fred

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The process is in this video. Let’s add it to the assembly guide or user guide.

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I agree, a “how to cut something” video is very much needed. We got bogged down in fixing issues, but we should get one of those made ASAP

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Putting the belt ends on with arthritis has been a challenge, but I had luck with what it looks like @Russ also discovered that might help others: CLAMPS

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It took me an embarrassingly long amount of time to realize that the black piece of the router is “threaded“ on and is removed by just spinning it off.

Making a note here in case anyone else comes to thread trying to figure this one out.

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I worked out that the lead screw nut goes in this one without the second recess because I could cross reference the hexagon pattern in the photo in the instructions, but it gave me pause. Don’t know if it’s worth adjusting the text l, just some feedback from a newb.

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If I’m not mistaken, can’t accidentally attach it to the other ones because there aren’t holes for the screws. You could try, probably wouldn’t get very far. This difference is actually visible in the image shared.

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Oh! So it is indeed. I suppose I would have discovered that if I had proceeded with them wrong. :slight_smile:

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