My maslow frame design

I’m working a frame design for my maslow. This is what I came up with made from 2 sheets of 3/4 plywood. Just figured I would get other people’s feedback on the design. The top cross piece I haven’t drawn in yet. I have plans for it just trying to figure out best way to fit it on the 2 sheets

It wont let me reply to the post @Bee or message you

4 Likes

@deckard_cain Welcome to our group.

I love that you have used Plywood. I would suggest adding 3 2 x4’s in the long axis at 90 degree angels to the material you have to form a T this would make it very strong / stiff. Well done. What program did you lay it out in? This looks like a job for glue and finishing nails.

Thank you

2 Likes

are you going to add a 10’ (or longer) top beam to this?

It looks pretty good if you are. you may have to fiddle with the distance from the from to the top beam to get it to match the sled balance point with your common materials

@bee its drawn in sketchup. Plan was to use glue and screws.

all the joints in the plywood overlap in one way or another

1 Like

@dlang Yea I’m still drawing that beam out. Just have to figure out where I can get it on the sheet

2 Likes

the beam is going to be larger than the sheet, so you will have to laminate it
from multiple pieces to get it long enough

That’s what I was planning on doing

This is how mine is done. It’s very strong and very little chance of bowing or twisting like with 2x.

2 Likes

@Mark_Shelton yea we build 4x8 portable walls at work and instead of using 2x4s we cut down plywood and build out own. And overlapping technic here is what I usually use and the seem to hold pretty ridgid.

2 Likes

Welcome @Deckard_cain, nice design, and as @Bee has pointed out, it’s great that it can be Maslowed out of 8x4 sheets. Other than the intended crossbar, which you may find better to just go and grab a nice straight length of around 10’, I can’t see any issues with this design, looks staunch, and when glued and screwed I imagine will be bulletproof.

If you’ve not yet discovered it, you may, as a Sketchup user, be interested in the free plug-in by Phlatboyz, that enables G-code generation and toolpathing in Sketchup. I’m not yet familiar with all it’s workings, but it appears to fit the bill, and the download I got was packaged with a G-code toolpath viewer (in Sketchup as a plug-in) which also seemed pretty useful. I’ll report back when I’ve played with it in greater depth, but it would definitely trim down the workflow if it’s up to standard.

I designed my frame using Sketchup also, and would be happy to share with all if there is a preferred place to deposit the file. Obviously, I could upload to the Sketchup 3Dwarehouse, but it might be nice to have a design file repository. If there is one already please point me in that direction and I’ll upload my effort.

All the best,
Miles

2 Likes

@deckard_cain FWW- I would consider the finish nails. Screws may be detrimental at this width of material. That is I never saw and example of furniture that was screwed together with boards of this width. Typically I’d see nails in older examples and staples in more modern construction. If I were adding the 2X4’s as previously mentioned I’d drill the connections going through the Plywood and be real carful of sucking the screw head through. Are you going to use Baltic Birch?

Just my 2 cents.

Thank you

1 Like

@mcmiley yea I thought about just grabbing a 2x4 for the top header also. I’ll have to go get the plugin. Thanks for letting me know about it. Just mainly been drawing stuff for my 3d printer in sketchup. So have had a lot ok practice

1 Like

@Bee at work when I make 4x8 walks out of plywood we usually staple it. Not sure what type of plywood I’m going to make it out of. Going to built the 2x4 frame for now then work towards this cleaner looking design. But who knows one day I might buy a second kit.

2 Likes

I half lapped or stub tenoned my frame joints dry so that I can take it apart again if I move house. To stop the joints drifting apart I used a Kreg pocket hole jig just to hold everything firm. I’m a bit of a fam of the pocket hole system for non-furniture builds, and have found it to work well in both hard and soft woods, but it’s important to get the right screws for the material you’re fixing.

Re: buying another kit; I dream of an industrial unit with a dozen of them whirring away ;¬)

Cheers,
Miles

1 Like

I already have 2 3d printers and looking at a third. So wont be surprised if I need a second cnc one day

2 Likes

What printers do you have?

Thank you

20180415_121737

I have a tevo tarantula, and a tronxy

1 Like

You can upload and post them here
maslow community garden