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First Custom Sign Aluminum and PVC Project

#1

Got it and running and built my first custom sign on the Maslow. I decided to try and cut brushed aluminum composit material for the backer and 13mm pvc for the letters. I was a bit worried about cutting the the ACM (also known as Dibond) but the Maslow did an excellent job.

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Project of the Week / Community Gardener for June 22, 2018
#2

Wow, that turned out perfect. What bit, speed, step-down did you use for the aluminium?

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#3

That came out nice! There is something special about seeing a Maslow-cut sign inside a shopping mall. I always think of malls as being a place where the standards for appearance are a little higher.

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#4

Turned out amazing!
What happened to the E?
image

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#5

Lost USB connection. Figured out it was the shop vac causing electrical interference. I had added ferrite suppressors to the USB line but it still caused the issue. So I just have to run the machine with no vac attached.

#6

They are extremely picky especially if its a corporate mall (i.e. Westfield). The Maslow did a great job on cutting these out so i had very little sanding to do. Once sanding paint was a breeze.

#7

I did it in one pass material was 0.125" thick and the pass was set at .135" - 30in/min. I think next time I will do to passes at a more conservative step down to see it will save me some time filing down the edges. as it was now I didn’t have to do much but its always nice to know the difference.

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#8

Oh man I love Dibond. We used to buy the Glossy Polyester version and do dye-sub prints for photographers. They always came out beautifully.

That’s a super impressive sign! Well done!

#9

Very nice work! May I ask what you use to secure the PVC to the aluminum?

#10

VHB tape and silicone.

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#11

I’m having the same issue with my ShopVac… Even with a 16ft hose and plugging it in across the room. I’ve been thinking of putting it in a soundproof box anyway… maybe I’ll wrap it in wire mesh too.

#12

Your shopvac hose can build up a great deal of static charge. Especially when sucking up PVC and metal shavings. Try grounding your shopvac hose with a simple copper stereo cable or naked copper cable. It can be low voltage. Or you can use an anti static hose.

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#13

Worn motor brushes are very electrically noisy. Replacing those might help…

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#14

I didn’t considered that. It IS crazy humid here in SC, but I’m going to try running the Shop Vac with the hose detached to try to isolate the problem.

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#15

I tried antistatic spray (moonshine of achohol, fabric softner and distilled water) and it helps only thing is you have to keep spraying the hose every once in a while and if you wait too long you get the error.

I am going to try and ground my hose next and will let you know if I run into any issues.

#16

Have you every tried cutting Coroplast, PVC or Foamcore??

#17

pvc cuts very easily but is messy. coroplast is easy. foamcore might have a lot of tear out, have not tried that, but paper thin top layers can easily be screwed up

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#18

https://www.supplyhouse.com/Z-FLEX-1TLXXXX0215-2-x-15-Ft-Triple-Lock-Aluminum-Flex-Duct
aluminum flex duct shouldnt’ build up static electricity

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#19

The yellow letters were cut out of .5" pvc. It does create alot of static electricity you can spray some anti static spray to combat the problem. For foam core or eagle cell (paper) based boards you would need a special drill bit to avoid tear out. Anaya tools sells the bit.

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#20

Hey Oscar, do you find upward fluted bits best for dibond? I guess 1/8" bit is best too.

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