Maslow Home Maslow Community Garden Newsletter

Maslow in Latinoamerica

Hi everyone! I’m Juan Carlos from Quito-Ecuador and I am trying to buy a Maslow Cnc to use here! I’m very exited because y think this is an incredible oportunity!

I have a little problem, I’m also new in this world, but I can’t find a ridgid router here and also I don’t find a official retailer in Ecuador, that maybe will be a problem in the future for the router:

2 questions for you:

  1. ridgid router quality? I can import one, how many hours I can work with this after it needs some repairs??

  2. maybe a can use an deWalt, stanley, makita, Bosch, blackanddeker, router instead of the ridgid one? This brands are more accessible in Ecuador!!

I really appreciate your comments and suggestions!

The only reason why you’d use a Ridgid router is if you’re intending the have the “default” Z-axis. Other routers would also work; the main thing to look for is if they have a depth adjustment screw, and if that screw is relatively easy to turn to adjust height.

There are some issues with that default z-axis (too much slop, not reliable, etc), so a lot of Maslow users end up building an improved z-axis, search for Meticulous Z-axis, or C-channel on this forum. If you build a z-axis like that, you can use any router you want, as long as you can built a way to hold it.

Here in New Zealand a lot of people are using the Bosch POF 1200 AE. It’s cheap and easily available. You can find instructions to modify it here:

You can pretty much use any router, but you need to think carefully about how you will build the Z-axis drive. If you copy the existing designs (Ridgid router popular in USA, Bosch router popular elswhere) then it’s easier.

When choosing an alternative router also look for one with variable speed control so that you can slow it down to much lower RPM to work with the Maslow’s feed rate.

Many routers have a top speed of around 30,000 RPM, that can be too fast.

I can’t get anything like that where I live, so I used a light dimmer switch to control the power going to the router.

Does that work? Isn’t the speed of the motor determined by the ac frequency?
Sure, the sound may change, but that’s because there is less power in the motor, it shouldn’t change the rpm.

You’d be right if these were induction motors, but most power tools use universal motors, which don’t care about the frequency. In fact, they can even run on DC, thus the name “universal”.

A dimmer does lower the available power, though, so the router won’t just run slower, it’ll also stall easier. In our application that shouldn’t be too much of an issue, we don’t need that much power at the speed we’re cutting.

@md8n I know it works in theory, but does it works well in practice? Looking to maybe do the same thing as my router isn’t adjustable (and a dimmer is cheaper than a new router).

an electronic speed control will give the motor more power as it is under load,
using a dimmer just reduces the power of the motor so it will slow down more
under load.

get something with a built-in electronic speed control

David Lang

It does work in practice. But I found it depends on the router and the dimmer.
I bought two cheap routers, exactly the same model, it works well for one (lots of control), but not the other.
The dimmer I bought is an electronic one. I had another larger router with an electronic speed control built in and the IC in the dimmer control is exactly the same as the one in the larger router.